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ABC/ARV: A scientific solution

Instead of extermination, the scientific solution is Animal Birth Control and Anti-Rabies Vaccinations (ABC/ARV), which involves:

  • Catching stray dogs of an area and segregating them.
  • Healthy, friendly dogs are sterilized & immunised against rabies
  • Then they are returned to their respective areas, where they live the rest of their lives helping the community.

Over 15,000 stray dogs are vaccinated against Rabies by Blue Cross each year.

Blue Cross sterilises around 600 street / community dogs and cats every month and vaccinates them against rabies.

This effort is to reduce the number of breeding homeless stray animals on the streets of our city. We conduct extensive adoption efforts to find homes for stray puppies and kittens in an effort to further reduce the homeless numbers.

If every home adopted a stray dog, the problem would be solved over night!

Animal Birth Control and Anti Rabies Vaccinations (ABC/ARV) for Stray Dogs

Government of India, Stray Dog Control Rules 2001, dictates Civic bodies to conduct Animal Birth Control and Anti-Rabies (ABC/ARV) programs for controlling Rabies and stray animal population. Recommended by the World Health Organisation and Animal Welfare Board of India, this is an effective measure to reduce stray animal population and Rabies.

It is unlawful to order or plan the removal of stray dogs from the streets. Please call your local GHMC office or the Dog Squad (+914024617017), and request ABC / ARV instead!

Extermination of dogs is dangerous.

Killing dogs does not help because we have external garbage disposal. Garbage attracts and breeds animals. Stray dog issues cannot be solved until garbage disposal is addressed. One breeding pair of stray dogs can give raise to 2,000 in their lifetime. Extermination of these animals is an offence, because it has proved dangerous in a rabies prone country.

Dogs are territorial. When dogs of an area are removed, a new pack enters attracted by the garbage. The new pack behaves aggressively, because they have invaded an unknown territory. They may be diseased, ready to reproduce, and extremely hostile. They may bite local people, thereby causing Rabies. Local dogs must be protected.

Safe community. Welfare of strays.

Wikipedia estimates 20,000 rabies deaths in India. With the co-existence of humans and dogs on the streets, the risk of exposure is alarming. There is an increasing fear among people regarding stray dogs.

Mission Rabies has set up a Nationwide Rabies Network and is raising funds to vaccinate 2 million stray dogs in the key hot-spots of India. In their pilot project last year, 5 staff from Blue Cross of Hyderabad participated in an Anti Rabies Camp in Bikaner, near Jaipur. In the 15-day camp, Teja, Lallu, Hari, Prasad and Rajkumar helped the Mission Rabies team vaccinate over 2,400 dogs.

Read More: Mission Rabies

So, Wikipedia says an estimated 31,000 of rabies death occur in Asia, of which 20,000 are from India. Given how humans and dogs co-exist on the streets of our country, the risk of exposure is alarming. That said, there's a general fear mounting among the public when it comes to the community dogs- popularly known as stray dogs. But we have news. We have organizations that are committing to work towards making India a rabies free country. They just got started and we have joined hands with them. Mission Rabies has set up a Nationwide Rabies Network and is raising funds to vaccinate 2 million stray dogs in the key hotspots of India. This is amazing to say the least. In their pilot project last year, 5 staff from Blue Cross of Hyderabad participated in an Anti Rabies Camp in Bikaner, near Jaipur. In the 15-day camp, Teja, Lallu, Hari, Prasad and Rajkumar helped the Mission Rabies team vaccinate over 2,400 dogs. Here's a video with snapshots of the work! This fight against rabies wins us two wars- safer communities and the cause of welfare of street dogs. To read more on Mission Rabies, please visit: http://www.missionrabies.com/ https://www.facebook.com/MissionRabies

Posted by Blue Cross of Hyderabad on Monday, 17 March 2014

Rabies is a fatal disease but can be prevented by the Anti Rabies Vaccine.

According to the World Health Organisation, when 75% of the dog population has been immunised against rabies, the disease can be controlled. The immunised dogs create disease-free zones, and act as barriers to the spread of Rabies.

Community participation for successful Animal Birth Control and Anti Rabies Vaccination (ABC/ ARV) programme is crucial. Good results, such as Rabies-free zones and puppy-free zones are seen, where it has received community support. The programme continues to be a struggle where residents or VIP’s in the community have objections. Though this is Animal Welfare Board of India and Government authorised safe solution, opposition continues to mar progress.

Create Rabies Free Zones!

  • Have dogs in your community sterilised & vaccinated.
  • Contact details of local GHMC stray dog units.
  • If you are not happy, lodge a complaint.
  • Submit to the Chief Veterinary Officer, GHMC.
  • Mark a copy to our email for follow up.

Behaving around stray dogs

  • Never Stare. This is seen as a threat.
  • Never Scream. The dog will become excited.
  • Never Run away. This encourages chasing.
  • Never Kick. The dog will bite.
Dog Behaviour Guide

As we sleep each night, sterilised and vaccinated street dogs guard our streets, and keep us safe!

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